Monday, July 5, 2010

Politics, Complicity & Pogroms

The bold actions of Mr Georgiou no doubt have the potential to seriously limit his capacity to influence his party in the future. His decision to cross the floor in 2006 would have similarly cost him power within his camp. He could have kept his mouth shut, risen through the ranks and hoped that with more power he could do what he believed was best, compromising until the time was right. But instead he has cultivated the very ground that democracy flourishes in, demonstrating deep respect for the gravitas of public office. Such moments, even if their consequences can't be quantified, are what strikingly feed and strengthen the political culture. Maxim 'Real Issues' (#360)

That's an interesting analysis by Maxim, that "He could have kept his mouth shut, risen through the ranks and hoped that with more power he could do what he believed was best, compromising until the time was right." But how would the 'electorate' have viewed his complicity in the final analysis? Plus, it is the complicity of those that do just such a thing that cost the lives and careers of those who take a stand on principle at the first step. By not supporting and joining the dissent when it matters, right at the beginning, the dissent may be crushed, and the pogrom completed.

The trouble, of course, is that the powers-in-office also can also control the media and even the general ethos of the public-in-general. In this light, pogroms can be carried and even sanctioned by the majority. In this light, standing-up, is standing-up to be mown down – it is suicide. A sacrifice that will not be understood by nearly all at the time, and with no definite outlook to there being any greater understanding in the future either.

Standing up to capitalism or, at least, the capitalism of not sharing profits and income, may be equated with this level of isolation against popular public belief at this time, to some extent anyway. People do not see the need for change, and so will not. Most people do not want change, unless the status-quo goes very wrong indeed.

B

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